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Comrades 'n' Jazz
8,90 CHF *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

Onstage at the annual Jazz Fest in New Orleans, Victor, the bandleader of the Hearts & Souls, gave the signal for the opening number. The dream about a celebratory concert he and his buddies had been waiting for more than forty years had become a reality. During the Cold War, all but one of the seven medical students and jazz musicians defected to the West. There, in freedom and prosperity, they continued their love for the Great American Songbook. After the drummer gave the eight-bar introduction to 'Caravan' by Duke Ellington, a chill went up the spine of the seven Comrades 'n' Jazz. The melody, the most memorable piece from their old repertoire, had always been their signature tune. During their earlier showbiz career in Romania, foreign music had been marred by strict censorship, which they had successfully circumvented by 'Russianizing' the titles of the songs and the names of the American composers. Victor mixed showbiz and medicine lucratively back then, by making a pact with a musically ignorant party hack in charge of their artistic activities on campus. The zealot supervised the dance band rehearsals and public appearances without having a clue as to what kind of music they were actually performing. For years, he remained convinced that the Hearts & Souls paid tribute to the communist dogma. Alas, toward the end of their medical school, the band was exposed for what it really was: a Jazz Band. The party leaders cancelled all future shows on campus, and threatened with further retaliation. But the jazz-loving band members continued their stealth love for the Great American Songbook by joining similarly minded musicians in the professional world of showbiz, far away from the college censors. Local impresarios adopted the seven medical students with open arms, offering them the best venues in the country. Victor and his buddies joined the Music Bourse-Bucharest's freelance musicians market. Its members held secret rallies in public parks or secluded beer gardens, giving birth to an ardent desire to defect to the West, by hook or by crook. The Hungarian Uprising in the late fifties gave the Hearts & Souls' pianist the first opportunity to defect to Austria, through the minefields. A couple of years later, fed up with the tyranny, the bass player and the guitarist took off to Istanbul in a makeshift raft, floating perilously on the Black Sea. Then the trombone played packed his bags and left for Israel, along with tens of thousands of Jews emigrating from the Soviet bloc. The Hearts & Souls' existence came to an end when the clarinetist swam across the Danube River to Serbia, walking all the way to Italy. Not wanting to risk his life, Victor chose to marry a visiting Polish recording star, and was heading to Warsaw. In Victor's last moment on Romanian soil, his old nemesis showed up at the airport, demanding a halt to his departure. Inside an interrogation room, a violent confrontation ensued, and the famous bandleader and freshly-graduated physician escaped from detention. Over four decades have passed since then. The Evil Soviet Empire became a sad chapter in modern history, together with the Iron Curtain. The Comrades 'n' Jazz were now free to play the Great American Songbook's music to their hearts' content. Victor organized a grandiose reunion of the seven brothers-in-arms. Where in the whole world would such a celebration be more appropriate than in New Orleans, the birthplace of jazz?

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 23.02.2020
Zum Angebot
Is It Good for the Jews?
6,40 CHF *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

In 2005, two then-officials of the American Israel Public Affairs Committee were indicted for handing over classified information to a foreign power. That the power in question was assumed to be Israel brought fresh credibility to a conspiracy theory that had been floating around Washington for years: that a powerful 'Jewish lobby” controls U.S. policy in the Middle East. The run-up to the Iraq war had provided new grist for this theory. A group of largely Jewish neoconservatives were among the architects of the war, and their motivations for removing Saddam Hussein were alternately ascribed to oil interests and the need to protect Israel. The allegations against these neoconservatives—especially former Deputy Secretary of Defense Paul Wolfowitz—echoed the case of the notorious Jonathan Pollard who pled guilty of spying for Israel in 1986. In this biting and incisive polemic, journalist and author Stephen Schwartz confronts the myth of a Jewish lobby head on, asking questions that no one else has dared to pose. What is the 'Jewish lobby”? How powerful is it? What was its involvement in the preparations for war in Iraq? Was there really a 'cabal” of neoconservative Jews in the administration of George W. Bush? How did AIPAC officials come to be accused, in 2004, of espionage? Above all, what is good for the Jews, and who decides it? Many of us forget that in the 1930s, a genuine home-grown fascist movement arose in America. At that time, Schwartz reminds us, it was not the official representatives of the Jewish community that stood up to the fascist goons of New York City, but Jewish socialists—the antecedents of today's neoconservatives. Likewise, today, it has not been the meek and timid leaders of the supposedly all-powerful Jewish Lobby that have defended the Jews but the reviled 'neocons” in the Bush Administration. Their strategic vision projects a foreign policy that is both good for America and good for the Jews. As a result, Schwartz predicts an increasing turn for Jewish voters away from their dysfunctional marriage with the Democratic Party and toward the Republicans. Ultimately Schwartz concludes that in today's America, a 'Jewish lobby” may no longer be necessary. In the face of the threatened collapse of the Lobby, he argues, American Jews should openly and proudly assume their proper role as moral and religious exemplars for their fellow Americans and cease acting like a frightened minority.

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 23.02.2020
Zum Angebot
A Window to Another Dimension (The Art of Orna ...

Artist Orna Ben-Shoshan demonstrates virtuous well-executed painting skills. Her artwork is created through a long and meticulous process. Orna is an autodidact artist that never attained formal art education. Being qualified as a graphic designer and illustrator, she developed her distinct style along many years of painting and experimenting. The decision to become a professional artist occurred to her when she moved to the U.S.A in 1982. Her creation gives the viewer a glimpse into a wide scope of events that take place in different dimensions of existence. According to Orna, alternative realities exists parallel to our physical world, from which visions are being channeled into her mind, and all she has to do is transfer them onto the canvas through her artistic technique. Every detail in her artwork conveys deep spiritual significance. Her creation emerges from her subconscious and there lies the source of her inspiration. The figures depicted in Orna's paintings have innocent tranquil faces. She explains that they arrive from places that are free of any evil or conflict, from utopian realities where spirit governs matter. One of the repeating motives in these characters are their cone-like feet, as Orna explains: 'The realm where these figures live has different physical laws than those familiar to us, gravitation there works differently, therefore they do not need feet to stabilize them on the ground. Their movement pattern is somewhere between hopping and floating.' Orna's artwork has been exhibited in numerous galleries, solo and group exhibitions in the USA, Europe and Israel.

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 23.02.2020
Zum Angebot
Children of Israel, Children of Palestine
24,99 € *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

Israeli Jews and Palestinians appear side by side for the first time in this remarkable book to share powerful feelings and reflections on growing up in one of the world's longest and most dangerous conflicts. Here, thirty-six men and women, boys and girls, tell of their coming-of-age in a land of turmoil. From kibbutzim in Israel and the occupied territories to Palestinian refugee camps in the West Bank and the Gaza Strip, Israeli Jews and Palestinians tell of tragedy and transcendence as they face their deepest fears and dream of a peaceful future. Listen to them as they recount stories of their brief and often violent youth. No matter what their ethnic identity, how much and how long they have suffered, these courageous autobiographers most often reveal a deep longing for peace. Perhaps their hopes and fears are best illustrated by a parable retold by eighteen-year-old Redrose (a pseudonym): 'Two frogs got trapped in a jar of cream. They couldn't jump out of the liquid and they couldn't climb because the sides of the jar were slippery. One frog said, 'By dawn I'll be dead,' and went to sleep. The second frog swam all night long and in the morning found herself floating on a pat of butter.'

Anbieter: Thalia AT
Stand: 23.02.2020
Zum Angebot
Is It Good for the Jews?
5,70 € *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

In 2005, two then-officials of the American Israel Public Affairs Committee were indicted for handing over classified information to a foreign power. That the power in question was assumed to be Israel brought fresh credibility to a conspiracy theory that had been floating around Washington for years: that a powerful 'Jewish lobby” controls U.S. policy in the Middle East. The run-up to the Iraq war had provided new grist for this theory. A group of largely Jewish neoconservatives were among the architects of the war, and their motivations for removing Saddam Hussein were alternately ascribed to oil interests and the need to protect Israel. The allegations against these neoconservatives—especially former Deputy Secretary of Defense Paul Wolfowitz—echoed the case of the notorious Jonathan Pollard who pled guilty of spying for Israel in 1986. In this biting and incisive polemic, journalist and author Stephen Schwartz confronts the myth of a Jewish lobby head on, asking questions that no one else has dared to pose. What is the 'Jewish lobby”? How powerful is it? What was its involvement in the preparations for war in Iraq? Was there really a 'cabal” of neoconservative Jews in the administration of George W. Bush? How did AIPAC officials come to be accused, in 2004, of espionage? Above all, what is good for the Jews, and who decides it? Many of us forget that in the 1930s, a genuine home-grown fascist movement arose in America. At that time, Schwartz reminds us, it was not the official representatives of the Jewish community that stood up to the fascist goons of New York City, but Jewish socialists—the antecedents of today's neoconservatives. Likewise, today, it has not been the meek and timid leaders of the supposedly all-powerful Jewish Lobby that have defended the Jews but the reviled 'neocons” in the Bush Administration. Their strategic vision projects a foreign policy that is both good for America and good for the Jews. As a result, Schwartz predicts an increasing turn for Jewish voters away from their dysfunctional marriage with the Democratic Party and toward the Republicans. Ultimately Schwartz concludes that in today's America, a 'Jewish lobby” may no longer be necessary. In the face of the threatened collapse of the Lobby, he argues, American Jews should openly and proudly assume their proper role as moral and religious exemplars for their fellow Americans and cease acting like a frightened minority.

Anbieter: Thalia AT
Stand: 23.02.2020
Zum Angebot
Comrades 'n' Jazz
8,40 € *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

Onstage at the annual Jazz Fest in New Orleans, Victor, the bandleader of the Hearts & Souls, gave the signal for the opening number. The dream about a celebratory concert he and his buddies had been waiting for more than forty years had become a reality. During the Cold War, all but one of the seven medical students and jazz musicians defected to the West. There, in freedom and prosperity, they continued their love for the Great American Songbook. After the drummer gave the eight-bar introduction to 'Caravan' by Duke Ellington, a chill went up the spine of the seven Comrades 'n' Jazz. The melody, the most memorable piece from their old repertoire, had always been their signature tune. During their earlier showbiz career in Romania, foreign music had been marred by strict censorship, which they had successfully circumvented by 'Russianizing' the titles of the songs and the names of the American composers. Victor mixed showbiz and medicine lucratively back then, by making a pact with a musically ignorant party hack in charge of their artistic activities on campus. The zealot supervised the dance band rehearsals and public appearances without having a clue as to what kind of music they were actually performing. For years, he remained convinced that the Hearts & Souls paid tribute to the communist dogma. Alas, toward the end of their medical school, the band was exposed for what it really was: a Jazz Band. The party leaders cancelled all future shows on campus, and threatened with further retaliation. But the jazz-loving band members continued their stealth love for the Great American Songbook by joining similarly minded musicians in the professional world of showbiz, far away from the college censors. Local impresarios adopted the seven medical students with open arms, offering them the best venues in the country. Victor and his buddies joined the Music Bourse-Bucharest's freelance musicians market. Its members held secret rallies in public parks or secluded beer gardens, giving birth to an ardent desire to defect to the West, by hook or by crook. The Hungarian Uprising in the late fifties gave the Hearts & Souls' pianist the first opportunity to defect to Austria, through the minefields. A couple of years later, fed up with the tyranny, the bass player and the guitarist took off to Istanbul in a makeshift raft, floating perilously on the Black Sea. Then the trombone played packed his bags and left for Israel, along with tens of thousands of Jews emigrating from the Soviet bloc. The Hearts & Souls' existence came to an end when the clarinetist swam across the Danube River to Serbia, walking all the way to Italy. Not wanting to risk his life, Victor chose to marry a visiting Polish recording star, and was heading to Warsaw. In Victor's last moment on Romanian soil, his old nemesis showed up at the airport, demanding a halt to his departure. Inside an interrogation room, a violent confrontation ensued, and the famous bandleader and freshly-graduated physician escaped from detention. Over four decades have passed since then. The Evil Soviet Empire became a sad chapter in modern history, together with the Iron Curtain. The Comrades 'n' Jazz were now free to play the Great American Songbook's music to their hearts' content. Victor organized a grandiose reunion of the seven brothers-in-arms. Where in the whole world would such a celebration be more appropriate than in New Orleans, the birthplace of jazz?

Anbieter: Thalia AT
Stand: 23.02.2020
Zum Angebot
A Window to Another Dimension (The Art of Orna ...

Artist Orna Ben-Shoshan demonstrates virtuous well-executed painting skills. Her artwork is created through a long and meticulous process. Orna is an autodidact artist that never attained formal art education. Being qualified as a graphic designer and illustrator, she developed her distinct style along many years of painting and experimenting. The decision to become a professional artist occurred to her when she moved to the U.S.A in 1982. Her creation gives the viewer a glimpse into a wide scope of events that take place in different dimensions of existence. According to Orna, alternative realities exists parallel to our physical world, from which visions are being channeled into her mind, and all she has to do is transfer them onto the canvas through her artistic technique. Every detail in her artwork conveys deep spiritual significance. Her creation emerges from her subconscious and there lies the source of her inspiration. The figures depicted in Orna's paintings have innocent tranquil faces. She explains that they arrive from places that are free of any evil or conflict, from utopian realities where spirit governs matter. One of the repeating motives in these characters are their cone-like feet, as Orna explains: 'The realm where these figures live has different physical laws than those familiar to us, gravitation there works differently, therefore they do not need feet to stabilize them on the ground. Their movement pattern is somewhere between hopping and floating.' Orna's artwork has been exhibited in numerous galleries, solo and group exhibitions in the USA, Europe and Israel.

Anbieter: Thalia AT
Stand: 23.02.2020
Zum Angebot