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Travelling with Ghosts: An Intimate and Inspiri...
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In the summer of 2002, Shannon Leone Fowler, a 28-year-old marine biologist, was backpacking with her Australian fiancé, Sean, in Thailand. They were planning to return to Australia after their excursion to Koh Pha Ngan, but their plans were tragically derailed when a box jellyfish - the most venomous animal in the world - wrapped around Sean's leg, stinging and killing him in minutes as Shannon helplessly watched. Rejecting the Thai authorities' attempt to label the death 'drunk drowning', Shannon ferried his body home to his stunned family - a family to which she suddenly no longer belonged. Shattered and untethered, Shannon set out on a journey to make sense of her loss. From Oswiecim, Poland (the site of Auschwitz) to war-torn Israel, shelled-out Bosnia, poverty-stricken Romania, and finally Barcelona, where she had first met Sean years before, Shannon charted a path through sorrow towards recovery. 1. Language: English. Narrator: Rachel Dulude. Audio sample: http://samples.audible.de/bk/orio/001046/bk_orio_001046_sample.mp3. Digital audiobook in aax.

Anbieter: Audible
Stand: 23.02.2020
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The Blood Gospel: The Order of the Sanguines, B...
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An earthquake in Masada, Israel, kills hundreds and reveals a tomb buried in the heart of the mountain. A trio of investigators - Sergeant Jordan Stone, a military forensic expert; Father Rhun Korza, a Vatican priest; and Dr. Erin Granger, a brilliant but disillusioned archaeologist - are sent to explore the macabre discovery, a subterranean temple holding the crucified body of a mummified girl. But a brutal attack at the site sets the three on the run, thrusting them into a race to recover what was once preserved in the tomb's sarcophagus: a book rumored to have been written by Christ's own hand, a tome that is said to hold the secrets to His divinity. The enemy who hounds them is like no other, a force of ancient evil directed by a leader of impossible ambitions and incalculable cunning. 1. Language: English. Narrator: Christian Baskous. Audio sample: http://samples.audible.de/bk/harp/003232/bk_harp_003232_sample.mp3. Digital audiobook in aax.

Anbieter: Audible
Stand: 23.02.2020
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A Man Called Blessed: The Caleb Books, Book 2  ...
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One man holds the key to locating the Ark of the Covenant - but he’s hidden deep in the desert and no one has seen him since he was a boy. In this explosive sequel to Blessed Child, Jewish soldier-turned-archaeologist Rebecca Soloman leads a team deep into the Ethiopian desert to find the one man who may know the final resting place of the Ark of the Covenant. Such a discovery would bring hope back to her people. Her search brings excitement and danger - including unexpected love and a discovery far more powerful than even the holy artifact. Meanwhile, Islamic fundamentalists dispatch Ismael, their most accomplished assassin, to pursue Rebecca and the man she’s searching for. These men fear that the Ark’s discovery will compel Israel to rebuild Solomon’s temple - on the very site of their holy mosque in Jerusalem. But the man they seek is no ordinary man. His name is Caleb, and he too is on a mission - to find again the love he embraced as a child and to share that love with the world. 1. Language: English. Narrator: Benjamin L. Darcie. Audio sample: http://samples.audible.de/bk/brll/005003/bk_brll_005003_sample.mp3. Digital audiobook in aax.

Anbieter: Audible
Stand: 23.02.2020
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Finding Sheba: An Omar Zagouri Thriller , Hörbu...
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For centuries, historians have speculated that the Queen of Sheba is nothing more than a seductive legend; but when undercover agent Omar Zagouri finds a tomb in a tunnel beneath Jerusalem, he unearths cryptic clues that may lead to the queen's final resting place. This discovery, if authentic, could throw into question the governmental claim to the Holy Land - and prove the Bible false. Wealthy collectors, ruthless archaeologists, and officials from Egypt, Ethiopia, Israel, and Yemen scramble to find and lay claim to the secret site. Dr. Richard Lyon of Brown University, the world's leading expert on the queen, is found murdered in his office, setting off a chain of deadly events. Omar desperately works to piece together the puzzle to locate the queen's burial ground, fearing another assassination will take place. He teams up with one of Lyon's protégées as well as with his ex-girlfriend, agent Mia Golding, in order to unravel the truth about the queen, expose a murderer, and reveal a timeless story of love, revenge, and sacrifice. 1. Language: English. Narrator: Bon Shaw. Audio sample: http://samples.audible.de/bk/brll/006724/bk_brll_006724_sample.mp3. Digital audiobook in aax.

Anbieter: Audible
Stand: 23.02.2020
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Jerusalem , Hörbuch, Digital, 1, 1530min
9,95 € *
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Jerusalem is the universal city, the capital of two peoples, the shrine of three faiths; it is the prize of empires, the site of Judgement Day, and the battlefield of today's clash of civilizations. From King David to Barack Obama, from the birth of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam to the Israel-Palestine conflict, this is the epic history of 3,000 years of faith, slaughter, fanaticism, and coexistence. How did this small, remote town become the Holy City, the 'centre of the world' and now the key to peace in the Middle East? In a gripping narrative, Simon Sebag Montefiore reveals this ever-changing city in its many incarnations, bringing every epoch and character blazingly to life. Jerusalem's biography is told through the wars, love affairs, and revelations of the men and women - kings, empresses, prophets, poets, saints, conquerors, and whores - who created, destroyed, chronicled and believed in Jerusalem. Drawing on new archives, current scholarship, his own family papers, and a lifetime's study, Montefiore illuminates the essence of sanctity and mysticism, identity, and empire in a unique chronicle of the city that many believe will be the setting for the Apocalypse. This is how Jerusalem became Jerusalem, and the only city that exists twice - in heaven and on Earth. Read by John Lee. 1. Language: English. Narrator: John Lee. Audio sample: http://samples.audible.de/bk/orio/000665/bk_orio_000665_sample.mp3. Digital audiobook in aax.

Anbieter: Audible
Stand: 23.02.2020
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Megiddo: The History of the Famous Archaeologic...
9,95 € *
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There are not many corners in the world that have seen as many people, civilizations, and armies as Tel Megiddo. Located in the western Jezreel Valley, it once laid upon the Via Maris, an ancient international trade route that connected ancient Egypt to the kingdoms and empires of Palestine, Syria, Anatolia, and Mesopotamia. It is because of this road that Megiddo saw so much carnage and bloodshed throughout its history. Many groups have coveted Tel Megiddo because of its strategic location guarding the entrance/exit of the Aruna Pass, now known as the Musmus Pass. Such groups ranged from the Canaanites, Egyptian, Israelites, Philistines and many others, including more recent states and empires, like the Ottomans, Napoleon’s French empire, and modern Israel. Megiddo's occupational history, or ages of intensive human occupation, began during the Neolithic Age (c. late-fifth millennium B.C.E.) and ended in the Iron Age (c. late-seventh century B.C.E.). But, according to the New Testament, everyone’s stories will end with the coming of Armageddon, otherwise known as Tel Megiddo. The history of the archaeological site and the Jezreel Valley is filled with many firsts and many lasts. Perhaps its wide plains were the location of the first recorded battle. It most certainly was the location of the first recorded chariot battle in history when the Pharaoh of Egypt, Thutmosis III of the Eighteenth Dynasty, attacked his former vassals, the Canaanites, after their kings formed a coalition with the Mesopotamian kings during the 15th century B.C.E. Such occurrences of violence and warfare have been common ordeals in the Jezreel Valley, and depending on who partook varied from guerilla-warfare to open-air fighting. The history in the Jezreel Valley had been so repetitively violent that the British General Edmund Allenby replicated, almost exactly, the tactic used by Thutmosis III nearly 3400 years before him when he too attacked Megiddo in 1918. It is perhaps 1. Language: English. Narrator: Colin Fluxman. Audio sample: http://samples.audible.de/bk/acx0/073429/bk_acx0_073429_sample.mp3. Digital audiobook in aax.

Anbieter: Audible
Stand: 23.02.2020
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Thinking in Java
47,99 € *
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Thinking in Java has earned raves from programmers worldwide for its extraordinary clarity, careful organization, and small, direct programming examples. It's the definitive introduction to object-oriented programming in the language of the world wide web. From the fundamentals of Java syntax to its most advanced features, Thinking in Java is designed to teach, one simple step at a time. Fully updated for J2SE5 with many new examples and chapters. Product Description "Thinking in Java should be read cover to cover by every Java programmer, then kept close at hand for frequent reference. The exercises are challenging, and the chapter on Collections is superb! Not only did this book help me to pass the Sun Certified Java Programmer exam; it's also the first book I turn to whenever I have a Java question." -Jim Pleger, Loudoun County (Virginia) Government"Much better than any other Java book I've seen. Make that 'by an order of magnitude'.... Very complete, with excellent right-to-the-point examples and intelligent, not dumbed-down, explanations.... In contrast to many other Java books I found it to be unusually mature, consistent, intellectually honest, well-written, and precise. IMHO, an ideal book for studying Java." -Anatoly Vorobey, Technion University, Haifa, Israel"Absolutely one of the best programming tutorials I've seen for any language." -Joakim Ziegler, FIX sysop"Thank you again for your awesome book. I was really floundering (being a non-C programmer), but your book has brought me up to speed as fast as I could read it. It's really cool to be able to understand the underlying principles and concepts from the start, rather than having to try to build that conceptual model through trial and error. Hopefully I will be able to attend your seminar in the not-too-distant future." -Randall R. Hawley, automation technician, Eli Lilly & Co."This is one of the best books I've read about a programming language.... The best book ever written on Java." -Ravindra Pai, Oracle Corporation, SUNOS product line"Bruce, your book is wonderful! Your explanations are clear and direct. Through your fantastic book I have gained a tremendous amount of Java knowledge. The exercises are also fantastic and do an excellent job reinforcing the ideas explained throughout the chapters. I look forward to reading more books written by you. Thank you for the tremendous service that you are providing by writing such great books. My code will be much better after reading Thinking in Java. I thank you and I'm sure any programmers who will have to maintain my code are also grateful to you." -Yvonne Watkins, Java artisan, Discover Technologies, Inc."Other books cover the what of Java (describing the syntax and the libraries) or the how of Java (practical programming examples). Thinking in Java is the only book I know that explains the why of Java: Why it was designed the way it was, why it works the way it does, why it sometimes doesn't work, why it's better than C++, why it's not. Although it also does a good job of teaching the what and how of the language, Thinking in Java is definitely the thinking person's choice in a Java book." -Robert S. StephensonAwards for Thinking in Java2003 Software Development Magazine Jolt Award for Best Book 2003 Java Developer's Journal Reader's Choice Award for Best Book 2001 JavaWorld Editor's Choice Award for Best Book 2000 JavaWorld Reader's Choice Award for Best Book 1999 Software Development Magazine Productivity Award 1998 Java Developer's Journal Editor's Choice Award for Best Book Thinking in Java has earned raves from programmers worldwide for its extraordinary clarity, careful organization, and small, direct programming examples. From the fundamentals of Java syntax to its most advanced features, Thinking in Java is designed to teach, one simple step at a time. The classic object-oriented introduction for beginners and experts alike, fully updated for Java SE5/6 with many new examples and chapters! Test framework shows program output. Design patterns are shown with multiple examples throughout: Adapter, Bridge, Chain of Responsibility, Command, Decorator, Facade, Factory Method, Flyweight, Iterator, Data Transfer Object, Null Object, Proxy, Singleton, State, Strategy, Template Method, and Visitor. Introduction to XML for data transfer; SWT, Flash for user interfaces. Completely rewritten concurrency chapter gives you a solid grasp of threading fundamentals. 500+ working Java programs in 700+ compiling files, rewritten for this edition and Java SE5/6. Companion web site includes all source code, annotated solution guide, weblog, and multimedia seminars. Thorough coverage of fundamentals; demonstrates advanced topics. Explains sound object-oriented principles. Hands-On Java Seminar CD available online, with full multimedia seminar by Bruce Eckel. Live seminars, consulting, and reviews available. See www.MindView.net Download seven free sample chapters from Thinking in Java, Fourth Edition. Visit http://mindview.net/Books/TIJ4 . Features + Benefits Bruce Eckel's Classic, award-winning Thinking in Java, Fourth Edition--now fully updated and revised for J2SE 5.0! ° The awards for this book keep piling up! They include Software Development Magazine Jolt Award for best book, 2003; Java Devloper's Journal Reader's Choice Award for Best Book, 2003, 2001, 1998; JavaWorld Editor's Choice Award for Best Book 2001; Software Development Magazine Productivity Award, 1999 ° 12 new chapters including chapters on Generics and Arrays Backcover "Thinking in Java should be read cover to cover by every Java programmer, then kept close at hand for frequent reference. The exercises are challenging, and the chapter on Collections is superb! Not only did this book help me to pass the Sun Certified Java Programmer exam; it's also the first book I turn to whenever I have a Java question." -Jim Pleger, Loudoun County (Virginia) Government"Much better than any other Java book I've seen. Make that 'by an order of magnitude'.... Very complete, with excellent right-to-the-point examples and intelligent, not dumbed-down, explanations.... In contrast to many other Java books I found it to be unusually mature, consistent, intellectually honest, well-written, and precise. IMHO, an ideal book for studying Java." -Anatoly Vorobey, Technion University, Haifa, Israel"Absolutely one of the best programming tutorials I've seen for any language." -Joakim Ziegler, FIX sysop"Thank you again for your awesome book. I was really floundering (being a non-C programmer), but your book has brought me up to speed as fast as I could read it. It's really cool to be able to understand the underlying principles and concepts from the start, rather than having to try to build that conceptual model through trial and error. Hopefully I will be able to attend your seminar in the not-too-distant future." -Randall R. Hawley, automation technician, Eli Lilly & Co."This is one of the best books I've read about a programming language.... The best book ever written on Java." -Ravindra Pai, Oracle Corporation, SUNOS product line"Bruce, your book is wonderful! Your explanations are clear and direct. Through your fantastic book I have gained a tremendous amount of Java knowledge. The exercises are also fantastic and do an excellent job reinforcing the ideas explained throughout the chapters. I look forward to reading more books written by you. Thank you for the tremendous service that you are providing by writing such great books. My code will be much better after reading Thinking in Java. I thank you and I'm sure any programmers who will have to maintain my code are also grateful to you." -Yvonne Watkins, Java artisan, Discover Technologies, Inc."Other books cover the what of Java (describing the syntax and the libraries) or the how of Java (practical programming examples). Thinking in Java is the only book I know that explains the why of Java: Why it was designed the way it was, why it works the way it does, why it sometimes doesn't work, why it's better than C++, why it's not. Although it also does a good job of teaching the what and how of the language, Thinking in Java is definitely the thinking person's choice in a Java book." -Robert S. StephensonAwards for Thinking in Java2003 Software Development Magazine Jolt Award for Best Book 2003 Java Developer's Journal Reader's Choice Award for Best Book 2001 JavaWorld Editor's Choice Award for Best Book 2000 JavaWorld Reader's Choice Award for Best Book 1999 Software Development Magazine Productivity Award 1998 Java Developer's Journal Editor's Choice Award for Best Book Thinking in Java has earned raves from programmers worldwide for its extraordinary clarity, careful organization, and small, direct programming examples. From the fundamentals of Java syntax to its most advanced features, Thinking in Java is designed to teach, one simple step at a time. The classic object-oriented introduction for beginners and experts alike, fully updated for Java SE5/6 with many new examples and chapters! Test framework shows program output. Design patterns are shown with multiple examples throughout: Adapter, Bridge, Chain of Responsibility, Command, Decorator, Facade, Factory Method, Flyweight, Iterator, Data Transfer Object, Null Object, Proxy, Singleton, State, Strategy, Template Method, and Visitor. Introduction to XML for data transfer; SWT, Flash for user interfaces. Completely rewritten concurrency chapter gives you a solid grasp of threading fundamentals. 500+ working Java programs in 700+ compiling files, rewritten for this edition and Java SE5/6. Companion web site includes all source code, annotated solution guide, weblog, and multimedia seminars. Thorough coverage of fundamentals; demonstrates advanced topics. Explains sound object-oriented principles. Hands-On Java Seminar CD available online, with full multimedia seminar by Bruce Eckel. Live seminars, consulting, and reviews available. See www.MindView.net Download seven free sample chapters from Thinking in Java, Fourth Edition. Visit http://mindview.net/Books/TIJ4 . Preface 1 Introduction 13 Prerequisites 14 Learning Java 14 Goals 15 Teaching from this book 16 JDK HTML documentation 17 Exercises 17 Foundations for Java 18 Source code 18 Errors 21 Introduction to Objects 23 The progress of abstraction 24 An object has an interface 26 An object provides services 29 The hidden implementation 30 Reusing the implementation 32 Inheritance 33 Interchangeable objects with polymorphism 38 The singly rooted hierarchy 43 Containers 44 Object creation & lifetime 46 Exception handling: dealing with errors 49 Concurrent programming 50 Java and the Internet 51 Summary 60 Everything Is an Object 61 You manipulate objects with references 61 You must create all the objects 63 You never need to destroy an object 67 Creating new data types: class 69 Methods, arguments, and return values 72 Building a Java program 74 Your first Java program 78 Comments and embedded documentation 81 Coding style 88 Summary 89 Exercises 89 Operators 93 Simpler print statements 93 Using Java operators 94 Precedence 95 Assignment 95 Mathematical operators 98 Auto increment and decrement 101 Relational operators 103 Logical operators 105 Literals 108 Bitwise operators 111 Shift operators 112 Ternary if-else operator 116 String operator + and += 118 Common pitfalls when using operators 119 Casting operators 120 Java has no "sizeof" 122 A compendium of operators 123 Summary 133 Controlling Execution 135 true and false 135 if-else 135 Iteration 137 Foreach syntax 140 return 143 break and continue 144 The infamous "goto" 146 switch 151 Summary 154 Initialization & Cleanup 155 Guaranteed initialization with the constructor 155 Method overloading 158 Default constructors 166 The this keyword 167 Cleanup: finalization and garbage collection 173 Member initialization 181 Constructor initialization 185 Array initialization 193 Enumerated types 204 Summary 207 Access Control 209 package: the library unit 210 Java access specifiers 221 Interface and implementation 228 Class access 229 Summary 233 Reusing Classes 237 Composition syntax 237 Inheritance syntax 241 Delegation 246 Combining composition and inheritance 249 Choosing composition vs. inheritance 256 protected 258 Upcasting 260 The final keyword 262 Initialization and class loading 272 Summary 274 Polymorphism 277 Upcasting revisited 278 The twist 281 Constructors and polymorphism 293 Covariant return types 303 Designing with inheritance 304 Summary 310 Interfaces 311 Abstract classes and methods 311 Interfaces 316 Complete decoupling 320 "Multiple in heritance" in Java 326 Extending an interface with inheritance 329 Adapting to an interface 331 Fields in interfaces 335 Nesting interfaces 336 Interfaces and factories 339 Summary 343 Inner Classes 345 Creating inner classes 345 The link to the outer class 347 Using .this and .new 350 Inner classes and upcasting 352 Inner classes in methods and scopes 354 Anonymous inner classes 356 Nested classes 364 Why inner classes? 369 Inheriting from inner classes 382 Can inner classes be overridden? 383 Local inner classes 385 Inner-class identifiers 387 Summary 388 Holding Your Objects 389 Generics and type-safe containers 390 Basic concepts 394 Adding groups of elements 396 Printing containers 398 List 401 Iterator 406 LinkedList 410 Stack 412 Set 415 Map 419 Queue 423 Collection vs. Iterator 427 Foreach and iterators 431 Summary 437 Error Handling with Exceptions 443 Concepts 444 Basic exceptions 445 Catching an exception 447 Creating your own exceptions 449 The exception specification 457 Catching any exception 458 Standard Java exceptions 468 Performing cleanup with finally 471 Exception restrictions 479 Constructors 483 Exception matching 489 Alternative approaches 490 Exception guidelines 500 Summary 501 Strings 503 Immutable Strings 503 Overloading &8216;+' vs. StringBuilder 504 Unintended recursion 509 Operations on Strings 511 Formatting output 514 Regular expressions 523 Scanning input 546 StringTokenizer 551 Summary 552 Type Information 553 The need for RTTI 553 The Class object 556 Checking before a cast 569 Registered factories 582 instanceof vs. Class equivalence 586 Reflection: runtime class information 588 Dynamic proxies 593 Null Objects 598 Interfaces and type information 607 Summary 613 Generics 617 Comparison with C++ 618 Simple generics 619 Generic interfaces 627 Generic methods 631 Anonymous inner classes 645 Building complex models 647 The mystery of erasure 650 Compensating for erasure 662 Bounds 673 Wildcards 677 Issues 694 Self-bounded types 701 Dynamic type safety 710 Exceptions 711 Mixins 713 Latent typing 721 Compensating for the lack of latent typing 726 Using function objects as strategies 737 Summary: Is casting really so bad? 743 Arrays 747 Why arrays are special 747 Arrays are first-class objects 749 Returning an array 753 Multidimensional arrays 754 Arrays and generics 759 Creating test data 762 Arrays utilities 775 Summary 786 Containers in Depth 791 Full container taxonomy 791 Filling containers 793 Collection functionality 809 Optional operations 813 List functionality 817 Sets and storage order 821 Queues 827 Understanding Maps 831 Hashing and hash codes 839 Choosing an implementation 858 Utilities 879 Holding references 889 Java 1.0/1.1 containers 893 Summary 900 I/O 901 The File class 901 Input and output 914 Adding attributes and useful interfaces 918 Readers & Writers 922 Off by itself: RandomAccessFile 926 Typical uses of I/O streams 927 File reading & writing utilities 936 Standard I/O 941 Process control 944 New I/O 946 Compression 973 Object serialization 980 XML 1003 Preferences 1006 Summary 1008 Enumerated Types 1011 Basic enum features 1011 Adding methods to an enum 1014 enums in switch statements 1016 The mystery of values() 1017 Implements, not inherits 1020 Random selection 1021 Using interfaces for organization 1022 Using EnumSet instead of flags 1028 Using EnumMap 1030 Constant-specific methods 1032 Multiple dispatching 1047 Summary 1057 Annotations 1059 Basic syntax 1060 Writing annotation processors 1064 Using apt to process annoIntended for Java programmers, this book explains the why of Java. From the fundamentals of Java syntax to its advanced features, it is designed to teach, one step at a time. Design patterns are shown with multiple examples throughout: Adapter, Bridge, Chain of Responsibility, Command, Decorator, Facade, Factory Method, Flyweight, and more.

Anbieter: buecher
Stand: 23.02.2020
Zum Angebot
Thinking in Java
47,99 € *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

Thinking in Java has earned raves from programmers worldwide for its extraordinary clarity, careful organization, and small, direct programming examples. It's the definitive introduction to object-oriented programming in the language of the world wide web. From the fundamentals of Java syntax to its most advanced features, Thinking in Java is designed to teach, one simple step at a time. Fully updated for J2SE5 with many new examples and chapters. Product Description "Thinking in Java should be read cover to cover by every Java programmer, then kept close at hand for frequent reference. The exercises are challenging, and the chapter on Collections is superb! Not only did this book help me to pass the Sun Certified Java Programmer exam; it's also the first book I turn to whenever I have a Java question." -Jim Pleger, Loudoun County (Virginia) Government"Much better than any other Java book I've seen. Make that 'by an order of magnitude'.... Very complete, with excellent right-to-the-point examples and intelligent, not dumbed-down, explanations.... In contrast to many other Java books I found it to be unusually mature, consistent, intellectually honest, well-written, and precise. IMHO, an ideal book for studying Java." -Anatoly Vorobey, Technion University, Haifa, Israel"Absolutely one of the best programming tutorials I've seen for any language." -Joakim Ziegler, FIX sysop"Thank you again for your awesome book. I was really floundering (being a non-C programmer), but your book has brought me up to speed as fast as I could read it. It's really cool to be able to understand the underlying principles and concepts from the start, rather than having to try to build that conceptual model through trial and error. Hopefully I will be able to attend your seminar in the not-too-distant future." -Randall R. Hawley, automation technician, Eli Lilly & Co."This is one of the best books I've read about a programming language.... The best book ever written on Java." -Ravindra Pai, Oracle Corporation, SUNOS product line"Bruce, your book is wonderful! Your explanations are clear and direct. Through your fantastic book I have gained a tremendous amount of Java knowledge. The exercises are also fantastic and do an excellent job reinforcing the ideas explained throughout the chapters. I look forward to reading more books written by you. Thank you for the tremendous service that you are providing by writing such great books. My code will be much better after reading Thinking in Java. I thank you and I'm sure any programmers who will have to maintain my code are also grateful to you." -Yvonne Watkins, Java artisan, Discover Technologies, Inc."Other books cover the what of Java (describing the syntax and the libraries) or the how of Java (practical programming examples). Thinking in Java is the only book I know that explains the why of Java: Why it was designed the way it was, why it works the way it does, why it sometimes doesn't work, why it's better than C++, why it's not. Although it also does a good job of teaching the what and how of the language, Thinking in Java is definitely the thinking person's choice in a Java book." -Robert S. StephensonAwards for Thinking in Java2003 Software Development Magazine Jolt Award for Best Book 2003 Java Developer's Journal Reader's Choice Award for Best Book 2001 JavaWorld Editor's Choice Award for Best Book 2000 JavaWorld Reader's Choice Award for Best Book 1999 Software Development Magazine Productivity Award 1998 Java Developer's Journal Editor's Choice Award for Best Book Thinking in Java has earned raves from programmers worldwide for its extraordinary clarity, careful organization, and small, direct programming examples. From the fundamentals of Java syntax to its most advanced features, Thinking in Java is designed to teach, one simple step at a time. The classic object-oriented introduction for beginners and experts alike, fully updated for Java SE5/6 with many new examples and chapters! Test framework shows program output. Design patterns are shown with multiple examples throughout: Adapter, Bridge, Chain of Responsibility, Command, Decorator, Facade, Factory Method, Flyweight, Iterator, Data Transfer Object, Null Object, Proxy, Singleton, State, Strategy, Template Method, and Visitor. Introduction to XML for data transfer; SWT, Flash for user interfaces. Completely rewritten concurrency chapter gives you a solid grasp of threading fundamentals. 500+ working Java programs in 700+ compiling files, rewritten for this edition and Java SE5/6. Companion web site includes all source code, annotated solution guide, weblog, and multimedia seminars. Thorough coverage of fundamentals; demonstrates advanced topics. Explains sound object-oriented principles. Hands-On Java Seminar CD available online, with full multimedia seminar by Bruce Eckel. Live seminars, consulting, and reviews available. See www.MindView.net Download seven free sample chapters from Thinking in Java, Fourth Edition. Visit http://mindview.net/Books/TIJ4 . Features + Benefits Bruce Eckel's Classic, award-winning Thinking in Java, Fourth Edition--now fully updated and revised for J2SE 5.0! ° The awards for this book keep piling up! They include Software Development Magazine Jolt Award for best book, 2003; Java Devloper's Journal Reader's Choice Award for Best Book, 2003, 2001, 1998; JavaWorld Editor's Choice Award for Best Book 2001; Software Development Magazine Productivity Award, 1999 ° 12 new chapters including chapters on Generics and Arrays Backcover "Thinking in Java should be read cover to cover by every Java programmer, then kept close at hand for frequent reference. The exercises are challenging, and the chapter on Collections is superb! Not only did this book help me to pass the Sun Certified Java Programmer exam; it's also the first book I turn to whenever I have a Java question." -Jim Pleger, Loudoun County (Virginia) Government"Much better than any other Java book I've seen. Make that 'by an order of magnitude'.... Very complete, with excellent right-to-the-point examples and intelligent, not dumbed-down, explanations.... In contrast to many other Java books I found it to be unusually mature, consistent, intellectually honest, well-written, and precise. IMHO, an ideal book for studying Java." -Anatoly Vorobey, Technion University, Haifa, Israel"Absolutely one of the best programming tutorials I've seen for any language." -Joakim Ziegler, FIX sysop"Thank you again for your awesome book. I was really floundering (being a non-C programmer), but your book has brought me up to speed as fast as I could read it. It's really cool to be able to understand the underlying principles and concepts from the start, rather than having to try to build that conceptual model through trial and error. Hopefully I will be able to attend your seminar in the not-too-distant future." -Randall R. Hawley, automation technician, Eli Lilly & Co."This is one of the best books I've read about a programming language.... The best book ever written on Java." -Ravindra Pai, Oracle Corporation, SUNOS product line"Bruce, your book is wonderful! Your explanations are clear and direct. Through your fantastic book I have gained a tremendous amount of Java knowledge. The exercises are also fantastic and do an excellent job reinforcing the ideas explained throughout the chapters. I look forward to reading more books written by you. Thank you for the tremendous service that you are providing by writing such great books. My code will be much better after reading Thinking in Java. I thank you and I'm sure any programmers who will have to maintain my code are also grateful to you." -Yvonne Watkins, Java artisan, Discover Technologies, Inc."Other books cover the what of Java (describing the syntax and the libraries) or the how of Java (practical programming examples). Thinking in Java is the only book I know that explains the why of Java: Why it was designed the way it was, why it works the way it does, why it sometimes doesn't work, why it's better than C++, why it's not. Although it also does a good job of teaching the what and how of the language, Thinking in Java is definitely the thinking person's choice in a Java book." -Robert S. StephensonAwards for Thinking in Java2003 Software Development Magazine Jolt Award for Best Book 2003 Java Developer's Journal Reader's Choice Award for Best Book 2001 JavaWorld Editor's Choice Award for Best Book 2000 JavaWorld Reader's Choice Award for Best Book 1999 Software Development Magazine Productivity Award 1998 Java Developer's Journal Editor's Choice Award for Best Book Thinking in Java has earned raves from programmers worldwide for its extraordinary clarity, careful organization, and small, direct programming examples. From the fundamentals of Java syntax to its most advanced features, Thinking in Java is designed to teach, one simple step at a time. The classic object-oriented introduction for beginners and experts alike, fully updated for Java SE5/6 with many new examples and chapters! Test framework shows program output. Design patterns are shown with multiple examples throughout: Adapter, Bridge, Chain of Responsibility, Command, Decorator, Facade, Factory Method, Flyweight, Iterator, Data Transfer Object, Null Object, Proxy, Singleton, State, Strategy, Template Method, and Visitor. Introduction to XML for data transfer; SWT, Flash for user interfaces. Completely rewritten concurrency chapter gives you a solid grasp of threading fundamentals. 500+ working Java programs in 700+ compiling files, rewritten for this edition and Java SE5/6. Companion web site includes all source code, annotated solution guide, weblog, and multimedia seminars. Thorough coverage of fundamentals; demonstrates advanced topics. Explains sound object-oriented principles. Hands-On Java Seminar CD available online, with full multimedia seminar by Bruce Eckel. Live seminars, consulting, and reviews available. See www.MindView.net Download seven free sample chapters from Thinking in Java, Fourth Edition. Visit http://mindview.net/Books/TIJ4 . Preface 1 Introduction 13 Prerequisites 14 Learning Java 14 Goals 15 Teaching from this book 16 JDK HTML documentation 17 Exercises 17 Foundations for Java 18 Source code 18 Errors 21 Introduction to Objects 23 The progress of abstraction 24 An object has an interface 26 An object provides services 29 The hidden implementation 30 Reusing the implementation 32 Inheritance 33 Interchangeable objects with polymorphism 38 The singly rooted hierarchy 43 Containers 44 Object creation & lifetime 46 Exception handling: dealing with errors 49 Concurrent programming 50 Java and the Internet 51 Summary 60 Everything Is an Object 61 You manipulate objects with references 61 You must create all the objects 63 You never need to destroy an object 67 Creating new data types: class 69 Methods, arguments, and return values 72 Building a Java program 74 Your first Java program 78 Comments and embedded documentation 81 Coding style 88 Summary 89 Exercises 89 Operators 93 Simpler print statements 93 Using Java operators 94 Precedence 95 Assignment 95 Mathematical operators 98 Auto increment and decrement 101 Relational operators 103 Logical operators 105 Literals 108 Bitwise operators 111 Shift operators 112 Ternary if-else operator 116 String operator + and += 118 Common pitfalls when using operators 119 Casting operators 120 Java has no "sizeof" 122 A compendium of operators 123 Summary 133 Controlling Execution 135 true and false 135 if-else 135 Iteration 137 Foreach syntax 140 return 143 break and continue 144 The infamous "goto" 146 switch 151 Summary 154 Initialization & Cleanup 155 Guaranteed initialization with the constructor 155 Method overloading 158 Default constructors 166 The this keyword 167 Cleanup: finalization and garbage collection 173 Member initialization 181 Constructor initialization 185 Array initialization 193 Enumerated types 204 Summary 207 Access Control 209 package: the library unit 210 Java access specifiers 221 Interface and implementation 228 Class access 229 Summary 233 Reusing Classes 237 Composition syntax 237 Inheritance syntax 241 Delegation 246 Combining composition and inheritance 249 Choosing composition vs. inheritance 256 protected 258 Upcasting 260 The final keyword 262 Initialization and class loading 272 Summary 274 Polymorphism 277 Upcasting revisited 278 The twist 281 Constructors and polymorphism 293 Covariant return types 303 Designing with inheritance 304 Summary 310 Interfaces 311 Abstract classes and methods 311 Interfaces 316 Complete decoupling 320 "Multiple in heritance" in Java 326 Extending an interface with inheritance 329 Adapting to an interface 331 Fields in interfaces 335 Nesting interfaces 336 Interfaces and factories 339 Summary 343 Inner Classes 345 Creating inner classes 345 The link to the outer class 347 Using .this and .new 350 Inner classes and upcasting 352 Inner classes in methods and scopes 354 Anonymous inner classes 356 Nested classes 364 Why inner classes? 369 Inheriting from inner classes 382 Can inner classes be overridden? 383 Local inner classes 385 Inner-class identifiers 387 Summary 388 Holding Your Objects 389 Generics and type-safe containers 390 Basic concepts 394 Adding groups of elements 396 Printing containers 398 List 401 Iterator 406 LinkedList 410 Stack 412 Set 415 Map 419 Queue 423 Collection vs. Iterator 427 Foreach and iterators 431 Summary 437 Error Handling with Exceptions 443 Concepts 444 Basic exceptions 445 Catching an exception 447 Creating your own exceptions 449 The exception specification 457 Catching any exception 458 Standard Java exceptions 468 Performing cleanup with finally 471 Exception restrictions 479 Constructors 483 Exception matching 489 Alternative approaches 490 Exception guidelines 500 Summary 501 Strings 503 Immutable Strings 503 Overloading &8216;+' vs. StringBuilder 504 Unintended recursion 509 Operations on Strings 511 Formatting output 514 Regular expressions 523 Scanning input 546 StringTokenizer 551 Summary 552 Type Information 553 The need for RTTI 553 The Class object 556 Checking before a cast 569 Registered factories 582 instanceof vs. Class equivalence 586 Reflection: runtime class information 588 Dynamic proxies 593 Null Objects 598 Interfaces and type information 607 Summary 613 Generics 617 Comparison with C++ 618 Simple generics 619 Generic interfaces 627 Generic methods 631 Anonymous inner classes 645 Building complex models 647 The mystery of erasure 650 Compensating for erasure 662 Bounds 673 Wildcards 677 Issues 694 Self-bounded types 701 Dynamic type safety 710 Exceptions 711 Mixins 713 Latent typing 721 Compensating for the lack of latent typing 726 Using function objects as strategies 737 Summary: Is casting really so bad? 743 Arrays 747 Why arrays are special 747 Arrays are first-class objects 749 Returning an array 753 Multidimensional arrays 754 Arrays and generics 759 Creating test data 762 Arrays utilities 775 Summary 786 Containers in Depth 791 Full container taxonomy 791 Filling containers 793 Collection functionality 809 Optional operations 813 List functionality 817 Sets and storage order 821 Queues 827 Understanding Maps 831 Hashing and hash codes 839 Choosing an implementation 858 Utilities 879 Holding references 889 Java 1.0/1.1 containers 893 Summary 900 I/O 901 The File class 901 Input and output 914 Adding attributes and useful interfaces 918 Readers & Writers 922 Off by itself: RandomAccessFile 926 Typical uses of I/O streams 927 File reading & writing utilities 936 Standard I/O 941 Process control 944 New I/O 946 Compression 973 Object serialization 980 XML 1003 Preferences 1006 Summary 1008 Enumerated Types 1011 Basic enum features 1011 Adding methods to an enum 1014 enums in switch statements 1016 The mystery of values() 1017 Implements, not inherits 1020 Random selection 1021 Using interfaces for organization 1022 Using EnumSet instead of flags 1028 Using EnumMap 1030 Constant-specific methods 1032 Multiple dispatching 1047 Summary 1057 Annotations 1059 Basic syntax 1060 Writing annotation processors 1064 Using apt to process annoIntended for Java programmers, this book explains the why of Java. From the fundamentals of Java syntax to its advanced features, it is designed to teach, one step at a time. Design patterns are shown with multiple examples throughout: Adapter, Bridge, Chain of Responsibility, Command, Decorator, Facade, Factory Method, Flyweight, and more.

Anbieter: buecher
Stand: 23.02.2020
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Historical Dictionary of the Tamils
104,30 € *
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The Tamils have an unbroken history of more than two thousand years. Tamil, the language they speak, is one of the oldest living languages in the world. The only people comparable to the Tamils in terms of their hoary past and vibrant present would be the Jews with one marked difference. The Tamils have always had their homeland 'Tamilaham' (alternately pronounced and spelt 'Tamizhaham') known today as Tamil Nadu which to them represents their mother and is revered by them as 'Tamizh Tai' literally 'Tamil Mother'. This is in striking contrast to the Jews who have been through a long and arduous struggle to gain their homeland, a deeply contested site to this day with Hebrewisation of Israel being a key marker of Jewish identity in the region. Tamils, by contrast have a clear numerical majority in the region that now comprises Tamil Nadu and the language unites rather than divides adherents of different faiths. The second edition of Historical Dictionary of the Tamils contains a chronology, an introduction, and an extensive bibliography. The dictionary section has over 600 cross-referenced entries on important personalities, politics, economy, foreign relations, religion, and culture. This book is an excellent resource for students, researchers, and anyone wanting to know more about the Tamils.

Anbieter: Dodax
Stand: 23.02.2020
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