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Smokin Aces
8,49 € *
zzgl. 1,49 € Versand

An incedendiary array of stars - including Ben Affleck, Andy Garcia, Ray Liotta, Jeremy Piven, Ryan Reynolds, Alicia Keys and Common - make Smokin' Aces the most explosive action DVD of the year, from Joe Carnahan, the acclaimed director of Narc. When a Mob boss takes out a million dollar hit on Buddy 'Aces' Israel - a sleazy Vegas showman turned FBI snitch - the Feds place Buddy in protective custody at a penthouse hide-out. While Buddy kills time with hookers, booze and drugs, an outrageous rogue's gallery of ultra-violent mobsters, smoking hot assassins and ruthless hit men are bring chainsaws, grenades, shotguns, knives and more to the hunt to rub out Aces and collect that cool million bucks.Special Features:Cowboy Ending.Deleted and Extended Scenes.Feature Commentary with Writer/Director Joe Carnahan and Editor Robert Frazen.Hot Fuzz International Trailer.Outtakes.Shoot 'Em Up: Stunts and Effects.The Big Gun.The Line-Up.

Anbieter: Zavvi
Stand: 25.02.2020
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Suntech Power
37,89 € *
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Erscheinungsdatum: 01/2010, Medium: Taschenbuch, Einband: Kartoniert / Broschiert, Titel: Suntech Power, Titelzusatz: Solar Power in Israel, Zhengrong Shi, Solar Power in China, First Solar, Q-Cells, List of Renewable Energy Companies by Stock Exchange, Photovoltaics, Photovoltaic Array, Redaktion: Surhone, Lambert M. // Timpledon, Miriam T. // Marseken, Susan F., Verlag: Betascript Publishers, Sprache: Englisch, Rubrik: Wirtschaft // Sonstiges, Seiten: 112, Informationen: Paperback, Gewicht: 183 gr, Verkäufer: averdo

Anbieter: averdo
Stand: 25.02.2020
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Man With A Movie Camera & Four Films (Masters O...
16,49 € *
zzgl. 1,49 € Versand

Voted one of the ten best films ever made in the Sight & Sound 2012 poll, and the best documentary ever in a subsequent poll in 2014, Man With A Movie Camera (Chelovek s kinoapparatom) stands as one of cinema’s most essential documents - a dazzling exploration of the possibilities of image-making as related to the everyday world around us. The culmination of a decade of experiments to render “the chaos of visual phenomena filling the universe”, Dziga Vertov’s masterwork uses a staggering array of cinematic devices to capture the city at work and at play, as well as the machines that power it. Presented from the definitive restoration from EYE Film Institute in Amsterdam and Lobster Films, the film is also presented with other works by Vertov, both before and after his masterpiece - Kino-Eye (1924), Kino-Pravda #21 (1925), Enthusiasm: Symphony of the Donbass (1931) and Three Songs About Lenin (1934) - in this 2-Disc Blu-ray edition. 2-DISC BLU-RAY SPECIAL FEATURES: New high-definition restored transfers of all five films Uncompressed PCM audio on all films Scores by The Alloy Orchestra for Man With A Movie Camera and Robert Israel for Kino-Eye New audio commentary on Man With A Movie Camera by film scholar Adrian Martin The Life and Times of Dziga Vertov, an exclusive, lengthy video interview with film scholar Ian Christie on Vertov’s career and the films in this set Dziga Vertov: Non-Fiction Film Thing, a new video essay by critic and filmmaker David Cairns 20-page booklet featuring notes on all five films

Anbieter: Zavvi
Stand: 25.02.2020
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Mohsen Makhmalbaf: The Poetic Trilogy
16,99 € *
zzgl. 1,49 € Versand

One of the preeminent figures of Iranian cinema, Mohsen Makhmalbaf has written and directed an impressive array of acclaimed films, winning accolades at international film festivals and the admiration of world cinema audiences. This collection presents three of Makhmalbaf s most lyrical films which the director has termed his Poetic Trilogy. Gabbeh tells of an elderly couple who stop by a stream to wash a vividly woven traditional Persian rug ( Gabbeh ). A beautiful woman, depicted in in the rug s elaborate design, suddenly appears and tells a heart-rending story of love and loss. A film imbued with the ideas of Sufism, The Silence tells of Khorshid, a young blind boy from Tajikistan who earns rent money for his family by tuning rare instruments but becomes enraptured by the sonorous music he hears on his way to work each day. The Gardener is an imaginative documentary which follows Makhmalbaf, and his son Maysam, to Israel to investigate the Bahá'í Faith, a religion with 7 million followers, which originated in Iran 170 years ago. As well as presenting a wealth of extras, this collection boasts stunning new restorations of Gabbeh and The Silence which truly bring the films rich colours and imagery to life. SPECIAL EDITION CONTENTS: Brand new 2K restorations of The Silence and Gabbeh from the original camera negatives High Definition Blu-ray (1080p) presentations of all three films Original Persian soundtracks with uncompressed LPCM audio Newly translated English subtitles Audio commentary on Gabbeh by critic Godfrey Cheshire Poetry in Motion: An Interview with Mohsen Makhmalbaf, an in-depth conversation between the Iranian auteur and film critic Jonathan Romney, newly produced for this edition Mohsen with Closed Eyes, an imaginatively filmed archival interview with Makhmalbaf on The Silence Original trailers Stills and collections gallery Reversible sleeve featuring original and newly commissioned artwork by Scott Saslow FIRST PRESSING ONLY: Illustrated booklet featuring new writing by film academic Negar Mottahedeh and Mohsen Makhmalbaf

Anbieter: Zavvi
Stand: 25.02.2020
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The Ten Tribes of Israel: Or the True History o...
9,95 € *
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The author assembles a vast array of anecdotes, facts, stories, legends, archaeological discoveries, language comparisons, and speculation from a large collection of different sources to support the claim that the American Indians are descendants of the Lost Ten Tribes of Israel. 1. Language: English. Narrator: Christopher Romance. Audio sample: http://samples.audible.de/bk/yurt/001060/bk_yurt_001060_sample.mp3. Digital audiobook in aax.

Anbieter: Audible
Stand: 25.02.2020
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The Question Is "Why?": Stanford M. Adelstein: ...
9,95 € *
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As a Jewish South Dakotan, Stanford M. "Stan" Adelstein has long encountered certain questions like "How did you end up there?" or "There are Jews in South Dakota?" He's even had to explain where to find South Dakota on the map. But when Adelstein met David Ben-Gurion in Israel in 1965, the former prime minister asked something else: "The question isn't 'where?'," Ben-Gurion said. "The question is 'why?'" Caught off guard, Adelstein responded with what was in his heart: He told Ben-Gurion that carving out a life of purpose on the South Dakota plains was his mission as a Jew. He has spent the years since then living out this response, serving a stunning array of local, national, and international causes. This book tells Adelstein's story of family, faith, business, politics, and philanthropy. It provides new perspectives on recent American and world history and on the lives of Jewish people in rural places. And, arriving when many Americans are questioning our democracy's durability, it inspires all who hope to improve their communities, their country, and the world.The Question Is "Why?" provides an intimate look at the life of a true statesman. Well into his ninth decade, Stanford Adelstein continues to live his values and impact society as an eminent South Dakotan, a proud American, and a Jew firmly rooted in his tradition and history. This is not only Adelstein's personal history, but the story of one man's impact on the world he lives in." (Robin Doroshow, executive director, Jewish Historical Society of the Upper Midwest) 1. Language: English. Narrator: Eric Steven Zimmer, Stanford M. Adelstein. Audio sample: http://samples.audible.de/bk/acx0/173693/bk_acx0_173693_sample.mp3. Digital audiobook in aax.

Anbieter: Audible
Stand: 25.02.2020
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Religion in the Ancient Mediterranean World, Hö...
9,95 € *
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Step back to a time when the mysteries of the universe could seem overwhelming. Cycles of nature kept predictable time with the sun, the moon, and the stars, yet crops failed, disease struck, storms ravaged, and empires fell without warning. In the region surrounding the Mediterranean Sea, people responded to such tumult with a rich variety of religious beliefs. From these beliefs, we get some of Western civilization's most powerful texts: the Mesopotamian Epic of Gilgamesh, the Hebrew Bible, the Greek epics of Homer, Ovid's Metamorphoses, and the New Testament, among many others. Composed largely of stories of human interaction with the divine, these narratives gave ordinary people a window into the unfathomable realm of the sacred. Archaeological remains show that ancient peoples also responded with a complex array of religious rituals, and their temples, cultic statues, funerary goods, and household devotional items are among the world's greatest cultural treasures. Using such textual and archaeological evidence, these 48 marvelous lectures explore the religious cultures of the ancient Mediterranean world, from the earliest indications of human religious practices during prehistoric times to the conversion of the Roman Empire to Christianity in the 4th century of the Common Era. You'll discover the religious traditions of a wide range of civilizations, including the ancient kingdom of Egypt; ancient Mesopotamia; ancient Syria-Palestine, including Israel and Judah; Minoan civilization on the island of Crete and the successive civilizations of the Greek mainland; and the city of Rome, whose empire dominated the entire Mediterranean world at the end of the ancient era. PLEASE NOTE: When you purchase this title, the accompanying reference material will be available in your Library section along with the audio. 1. Language: English. Narrator: Glenn S. Holland. Audio sample: http://samples.audible.de/bk/tcco/000250/bk_tcco_000250_sample.mp3. Digital audiobook in aax.

Anbieter: Audible
Stand: 25.02.2020
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Thinking in Java
47,99 € *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

Thinking in Java has earned raves from programmers worldwide for its extraordinary clarity, careful organization, and small, direct programming examples. It's the definitive introduction to object-oriented programming in the language of the world wide web. From the fundamentals of Java syntax to its most advanced features, Thinking in Java is designed to teach, one simple step at a time. Fully updated for J2SE5 with many new examples and chapters. Product Description "Thinking in Java should be read cover to cover by every Java programmer, then kept close at hand for frequent reference. The exercises are challenging, and the chapter on Collections is superb! Not only did this book help me to pass the Sun Certified Java Programmer exam; it's also the first book I turn to whenever I have a Java question." -Jim Pleger, Loudoun County (Virginia) Government"Much better than any other Java book I've seen. Make that 'by an order of magnitude'.... Very complete, with excellent right-to-the-point examples and intelligent, not dumbed-down, explanations.... In contrast to many other Java books I found it to be unusually mature, consistent, intellectually honest, well-written, and precise. IMHO, an ideal book for studying Java." -Anatoly Vorobey, Technion University, Haifa, Israel"Absolutely one of the best programming tutorials I've seen for any language." -Joakim Ziegler, FIX sysop"Thank you again for your awesome book. I was really floundering (being a non-C programmer), but your book has brought me up to speed as fast as I could read it. It's really cool to be able to understand the underlying principles and concepts from the start, rather than having to try to build that conceptual model through trial and error. Hopefully I will be able to attend your seminar in the not-too-distant future." -Randall R. Hawley, automation technician, Eli Lilly & Co."This is one of the best books I've read about a programming language.... The best book ever written on Java." -Ravindra Pai, Oracle Corporation, SUNOS product line"Bruce, your book is wonderful! Your explanations are clear and direct. Through your fantastic book I have gained a tremendous amount of Java knowledge. The exercises are also fantastic and do an excellent job reinforcing the ideas explained throughout the chapters. I look forward to reading more books written by you. Thank you for the tremendous service that you are providing by writing such great books. My code will be much better after reading Thinking in Java. I thank you and I'm sure any programmers who will have to maintain my code are also grateful to you." -Yvonne Watkins, Java artisan, Discover Technologies, Inc."Other books cover the what of Java (describing the syntax and the libraries) or the how of Java (practical programming examples). Thinking in Java is the only book I know that explains the why of Java: Why it was designed the way it was, why it works the way it does, why it sometimes doesn't work, why it's better than C++, why it's not. Although it also does a good job of teaching the what and how of the language, Thinking in Java is definitely the thinking person's choice in a Java book." -Robert S. StephensonAwards for Thinking in Java2003 Software Development Magazine Jolt Award for Best Book 2003 Java Developer's Journal Reader's Choice Award for Best Book 2001 JavaWorld Editor's Choice Award for Best Book 2000 JavaWorld Reader's Choice Award for Best Book 1999 Software Development Magazine Productivity Award 1998 Java Developer's Journal Editor's Choice Award for Best Book Thinking in Java has earned raves from programmers worldwide for its extraordinary clarity, careful organization, and small, direct programming examples. From the fundamentals of Java syntax to its most advanced features, Thinking in Java is designed to teach, one simple step at a time. The classic object-oriented introduction for beginners and experts alike, fully updated for Java SE5/6 with many new examples and chapters! Test framework shows program output. Design patterns are shown with multiple examples throughout: Adapter, Bridge, Chain of Responsibility, Command, Decorator, Facade, Factory Method, Flyweight, Iterator, Data Transfer Object, Null Object, Proxy, Singleton, State, Strategy, Template Method, and Visitor. Introduction to XML for data transfer; SWT, Flash for user interfaces. Completely rewritten concurrency chapter gives you a solid grasp of threading fundamentals. 500+ working Java programs in 700+ compiling files, rewritten for this edition and Java SE5/6. Companion web site includes all source code, annotated solution guide, weblog, and multimedia seminars. Thorough coverage of fundamentals; demonstrates advanced topics. Explains sound object-oriented principles. Hands-On Java Seminar CD available online, with full multimedia seminar by Bruce Eckel. Live seminars, consulting, and reviews available. See www.MindView.net Download seven free sample chapters from Thinking in Java, Fourth Edition. Visit http://mindview.net/Books/TIJ4 . Features + Benefits Bruce Eckel's Classic, award-winning Thinking in Java, Fourth Edition--now fully updated and revised for J2SE 5.0! ° The awards for this book keep piling up! They include Software Development Magazine Jolt Award for best book, 2003; Java Devloper's Journal Reader's Choice Award for Best Book, 2003, 2001, 1998; JavaWorld Editor's Choice Award for Best Book 2001; Software Development Magazine Productivity Award, 1999 ° 12 new chapters including chapters on Generics and Arrays Backcover "Thinking in Java should be read cover to cover by every Java programmer, then kept close at hand for frequent reference. The exercises are challenging, and the chapter on Collections is superb! Not only did this book help me to pass the Sun Certified Java Programmer exam; it's also the first book I turn to whenever I have a Java question." -Jim Pleger, Loudoun County (Virginia) Government"Much better than any other Java book I've seen. Make that 'by an order of magnitude'.... Very complete, with excellent right-to-the-point examples and intelligent, not dumbed-down, explanations.... In contrast to many other Java books I found it to be unusually mature, consistent, intellectually honest, well-written, and precise. IMHO, an ideal book for studying Java." -Anatoly Vorobey, Technion University, Haifa, Israel"Absolutely one of the best programming tutorials I've seen for any language." -Joakim Ziegler, FIX sysop"Thank you again for your awesome book. I was really floundering (being a non-C programmer), but your book has brought me up to speed as fast as I could read it. It's really cool to be able to understand the underlying principles and concepts from the start, rather than having to try to build that conceptual model through trial and error. Hopefully I will be able to attend your seminar in the not-too-distant future." -Randall R. Hawley, automation technician, Eli Lilly & Co."This is one of the best books I've read about a programming language.... The best book ever written on Java." -Ravindra Pai, Oracle Corporation, SUNOS product line"Bruce, your book is wonderful! Your explanations are clear and direct. Through your fantastic book I have gained a tremendous amount of Java knowledge. The exercises are also fantastic and do an excellent job reinforcing the ideas explained throughout the chapters. I look forward to reading more books written by you. Thank you for the tremendous service that you are providing by writing such great books. My code will be much better after reading Thinking in Java. I thank you and I'm sure any programmers who will have to maintain my code are also grateful to you." -Yvonne Watkins, Java artisan, Discover Technologies, Inc."Other books cover the what of Java (describing the syntax and the libraries) or the how of Java (practical programming examples). Thinking in Java is the only book I know that explains the why of Java: Why it was designed the way it was, why it works the way it does, why it sometimes doesn't work, why it's better than C++, why it's not. Although it also does a good job of teaching the what and how of the language, Thinking in Java is definitely the thinking person's choice in a Java book." -Robert S. StephensonAwards for Thinking in Java2003 Software Development Magazine Jolt Award for Best Book 2003 Java Developer's Journal Reader's Choice Award for Best Book 2001 JavaWorld Editor's Choice Award for Best Book 2000 JavaWorld Reader's Choice Award for Best Book 1999 Software Development Magazine Productivity Award 1998 Java Developer's Journal Editor's Choice Award for Best Book Thinking in Java has earned raves from programmers worldwide for its extraordinary clarity, careful organization, and small, direct programming examples. From the fundamentals of Java syntax to its most advanced features, Thinking in Java is designed to teach, one simple step at a time. The classic object-oriented introduction for beginners and experts alike, fully updated for Java SE5/6 with many new examples and chapters! Test framework shows program output. Design patterns are shown with multiple examples throughout: Adapter, Bridge, Chain of Responsibility, Command, Decorator, Facade, Factory Method, Flyweight, Iterator, Data Transfer Object, Null Object, Proxy, Singleton, State, Strategy, Template Method, and Visitor. Introduction to XML for data transfer; SWT, Flash for user interfaces. Completely rewritten concurrency chapter gives you a solid grasp of threading fundamentals. 500+ working Java programs in 700+ compiling files, rewritten for this edition and Java SE5/6. Companion web site includes all source code, annotated solution guide, weblog, and multimedia seminars. Thorough coverage of fundamentals; demonstrates advanced topics. Explains sound object-oriented principles. Hands-On Java Seminar CD available online, with full multimedia seminar by Bruce Eckel. Live seminars, consulting, and reviews available. See www.MindView.net Download seven free sample chapters from Thinking in Java, Fourth Edition. Visit http://mindview.net/Books/TIJ4 . Preface 1 Introduction 13 Prerequisites 14 Learning Java 14 Goals 15 Teaching from this book 16 JDK HTML documentation 17 Exercises 17 Foundations for Java 18 Source code 18 Errors 21 Introduction to Objects 23 The progress of abstraction 24 An object has an interface 26 An object provides services 29 The hidden implementation 30 Reusing the implementation 32 Inheritance 33 Interchangeable objects with polymorphism 38 The singly rooted hierarchy 43 Containers 44 Object creation & lifetime 46 Exception handling: dealing with errors 49 Concurrent programming 50 Java and the Internet 51 Summary 60 Everything Is an Object 61 You manipulate objects with references 61 You must create all the objects 63 You never need to destroy an object 67 Creating new data types: class 69 Methods, arguments, and return values 72 Building a Java program 74 Your first Java program 78 Comments and embedded documentation 81 Coding style 88 Summary 89 Exercises 89 Operators 93 Simpler print statements 93 Using Java operators 94 Precedence 95 Assignment 95 Mathematical operators 98 Auto increment and decrement 101 Relational operators 103 Logical operators 105 Literals 108 Bitwise operators 111 Shift operators 112 Ternary if-else operator 116 String operator + and += 118 Common pitfalls when using operators 119 Casting operators 120 Java has no "sizeof" 122 A compendium of operators 123 Summary 133 Controlling Execution 135 true and false 135 if-else 135 Iteration 137 Foreach syntax 140 return 143 break and continue 144 The infamous "goto" 146 switch 151 Summary 154 Initialization & Cleanup 155 Guaranteed initialization with the constructor 155 Method overloading 158 Default constructors 166 The this keyword 167 Cleanup: finalization and garbage collection 173 Member initialization 181 Constructor initialization 185 Array initialization 193 Enumerated types 204 Summary 207 Access Control 209 package: the library unit 210 Java access specifiers 221 Interface and implementation 228 Class access 229 Summary 233 Reusing Classes 237 Composition syntax 237 Inheritance syntax 241 Delegation 246 Combining composition and inheritance 249 Choosing composition vs. inheritance 256 protected 258 Upcasting 260 The final keyword 262 Initialization and class loading 272 Summary 274 Polymorphism 277 Upcasting revisited 278 The twist 281 Constructors and polymorphism 293 Covariant return types 303 Designing with inheritance 304 Summary 310 Interfaces 311 Abstract classes and methods 311 Interfaces 316 Complete decoupling 320 "Multiple in heritance" in Java 326 Extending an interface with inheritance 329 Adapting to an interface 331 Fields in interfaces 335 Nesting interfaces 336 Interfaces and factories 339 Summary 343 Inner Classes 345 Creating inner classes 345 The link to the outer class 347 Using .this and .new 350 Inner classes and upcasting 352 Inner classes in methods and scopes 354 Anonymous inner classes 356 Nested classes 364 Why inner classes? 369 Inheriting from inner classes 382 Can inner classes be overridden? 383 Local inner classes 385 Inner-class identifiers 387 Summary 388 Holding Your Objects 389 Generics and type-safe containers 390 Basic concepts 394 Adding groups of elements 396 Printing containers 398 List 401 Iterator 406 LinkedList 410 Stack 412 Set 415 Map 419 Queue 423 Collection vs. Iterator 427 Foreach and iterators 431 Summary 437 Error Handling with Exceptions 443 Concepts 444 Basic exceptions 445 Catching an exception 447 Creating your own exceptions 449 The exception specification 457 Catching any exception 458 Standard Java exceptions 468 Performing cleanup with finally 471 Exception restrictions 479 Constructors 483 Exception matching 489 Alternative approaches 490 Exception guidelines 500 Summary 501 Strings 503 Immutable Strings 503 Overloading &8216;+' vs. StringBuilder 504 Unintended recursion 509 Operations on Strings 511 Formatting output 514 Regular expressions 523 Scanning input 546 StringTokenizer 551 Summary 552 Type Information 553 The need for RTTI 553 The Class object 556 Checking before a cast 569 Registered factories 582 instanceof vs. Class equivalence 586 Reflection: runtime class information 588 Dynamic proxies 593 Null Objects 598 Interfaces and type information 607 Summary 613 Generics 617 Comparison with C++ 618 Simple generics 619 Generic interfaces 627 Generic methods 631 Anonymous inner classes 645 Building complex models 647 The mystery of erasure 650 Compensating for erasure 662 Bounds 673 Wildcards 677 Issues 694 Self-bounded types 701 Dynamic type safety 710 Exceptions 711 Mixins 713 Latent typing 721 Compensating for the lack of latent typing 726 Using function objects as strategies 737 Summary: Is casting really so bad? 743 Arrays 747 Why arrays are special 747 Arrays are first-class objects 749 Returning an array 753 Multidimensional arrays 754 Arrays and generics 759 Creating test data 762 Arrays utilities 775 Summary 786 Containers in Depth 791 Full container taxonomy 791 Filling containers 793 Collection functionality 809 Optional operations 813 List functionality 817 Sets and storage order 821 Queues 827 Understanding Maps 831 Hashing and hash codes 839 Choosing an implementation 858 Utilities 879 Holding references 889 Java 1.0/1.1 containers 893 Summary 900 I/O 901 The File class 901 Input and output 914 Adding attributes and useful interfaces 918 Readers & Writers 922 Off by itself: RandomAccessFile 926 Typical uses of I/O streams 927 File reading & writing utilities 936 Standard I/O 941 Process control 944 New I/O 946 Compression 973 Object serialization 980 XML 1003 Preferences 1006 Summary 1008 Enumerated Types 1011 Basic enum features 1011 Adding methods to an enum 1014 enums in switch statements 1016 The mystery of values() 1017 Implements, not inherits 1020 Random selection 1021 Using interfaces for organization 1022 Using EnumSet instead of flags 1028 Using EnumMap 1030 Constant-specific methods 1032 Multiple dispatching 1047 Summary 1057 Annotations 1059 Basic syntax 1060 Writing annotation processors 1064 Using apt to process annoIntended for Java programmers, this book explains the why of Java. From the fundamentals of Java syntax to its advanced features, it is designed to teach, one step at a time. Design patterns are shown with multiple examples throughout: Adapter, Bridge, Chain of Responsibility, Command, Decorator, Facade, Factory Method, Flyweight, and more.

Anbieter: buecher
Stand: 25.02.2020
Zum Angebot
Thinking in Java
47,99 € *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

Thinking in Java has earned raves from programmers worldwide for its extraordinary clarity, careful organization, and small, direct programming examples. It's the definitive introduction to object-oriented programming in the language of the world wide web. From the fundamentals of Java syntax to its most advanced features, Thinking in Java is designed to teach, one simple step at a time. Fully updated for J2SE5 with many new examples and chapters. Product Description "Thinking in Java should be read cover to cover by every Java programmer, then kept close at hand for frequent reference. The exercises are challenging, and the chapter on Collections is superb! Not only did this book help me to pass the Sun Certified Java Programmer exam; it's also the first book I turn to whenever I have a Java question." -Jim Pleger, Loudoun County (Virginia) Government"Much better than any other Java book I've seen. Make that 'by an order of magnitude'.... Very complete, with excellent right-to-the-point examples and intelligent, not dumbed-down, explanations.... In contrast to many other Java books I found it to be unusually mature, consistent, intellectually honest, well-written, and precise. IMHO, an ideal book for studying Java." -Anatoly Vorobey, Technion University, Haifa, Israel"Absolutely one of the best programming tutorials I've seen for any language." -Joakim Ziegler, FIX sysop"Thank you again for your awesome book. I was really floundering (being a non-C programmer), but your book has brought me up to speed as fast as I could read it. It's really cool to be able to understand the underlying principles and concepts from the start, rather than having to try to build that conceptual model through trial and error. Hopefully I will be able to attend your seminar in the not-too-distant future." -Randall R. Hawley, automation technician, Eli Lilly & Co."This is one of the best books I've read about a programming language.... The best book ever written on Java." -Ravindra Pai, Oracle Corporation, SUNOS product line"Bruce, your book is wonderful! Your explanations are clear and direct. Through your fantastic book I have gained a tremendous amount of Java knowledge. The exercises are also fantastic and do an excellent job reinforcing the ideas explained throughout the chapters. I look forward to reading more books written by you. Thank you for the tremendous service that you are providing by writing such great books. My code will be much better after reading Thinking in Java. I thank you and I'm sure any programmers who will have to maintain my code are also grateful to you." -Yvonne Watkins, Java artisan, Discover Technologies, Inc."Other books cover the what of Java (describing the syntax and the libraries) or the how of Java (practical programming examples). Thinking in Java is the only book I know that explains the why of Java: Why it was designed the way it was, why it works the way it does, why it sometimes doesn't work, why it's better than C++, why it's not. Although it also does a good job of teaching the what and how of the language, Thinking in Java is definitely the thinking person's choice in a Java book." -Robert S. StephensonAwards for Thinking in Java2003 Software Development Magazine Jolt Award for Best Book 2003 Java Developer's Journal Reader's Choice Award for Best Book 2001 JavaWorld Editor's Choice Award for Best Book 2000 JavaWorld Reader's Choice Award for Best Book 1999 Software Development Magazine Productivity Award 1998 Java Developer's Journal Editor's Choice Award for Best Book Thinking in Java has earned raves from programmers worldwide for its extraordinary clarity, careful organization, and small, direct programming examples. From the fundamentals of Java syntax to its most advanced features, Thinking in Java is designed to teach, one simple step at a time. The classic object-oriented introduction for beginners and experts alike, fully updated for Java SE5/6 with many new examples and chapters! Test framework shows program output. Design patterns are shown with multiple examples throughout: Adapter, Bridge, Chain of Responsibility, Command, Decorator, Facade, Factory Method, Flyweight, Iterator, Data Transfer Object, Null Object, Proxy, Singleton, State, Strategy, Template Method, and Visitor. Introduction to XML for data transfer; SWT, Flash for user interfaces. Completely rewritten concurrency chapter gives you a solid grasp of threading fundamentals. 500+ working Java programs in 700+ compiling files, rewritten for this edition and Java SE5/6. Companion web site includes all source code, annotated solution guide, weblog, and multimedia seminars. Thorough coverage of fundamentals; demonstrates advanced topics. Explains sound object-oriented principles. Hands-On Java Seminar CD available online, with full multimedia seminar by Bruce Eckel. Live seminars, consulting, and reviews available. See www.MindView.net Download seven free sample chapters from Thinking in Java, Fourth Edition. Visit http://mindview.net/Books/TIJ4 . Features + Benefits Bruce Eckel's Classic, award-winning Thinking in Java, Fourth Edition--now fully updated and revised for J2SE 5.0! ° The awards for this book keep piling up! They include Software Development Magazine Jolt Award for best book, 2003; Java Devloper's Journal Reader's Choice Award for Best Book, 2003, 2001, 1998; JavaWorld Editor's Choice Award for Best Book 2001; Software Development Magazine Productivity Award, 1999 ° 12 new chapters including chapters on Generics and Arrays Backcover "Thinking in Java should be read cover to cover by every Java programmer, then kept close at hand for frequent reference. The exercises are challenging, and the chapter on Collections is superb! Not only did this book help me to pass the Sun Certified Java Programmer exam; it's also the first book I turn to whenever I have a Java question." -Jim Pleger, Loudoun County (Virginia) Government"Much better than any other Java book I've seen. Make that 'by an order of magnitude'.... Very complete, with excellent right-to-the-point examples and intelligent, not dumbed-down, explanations.... In contrast to many other Java books I found it to be unusually mature, consistent, intellectually honest, well-written, and precise. IMHO, an ideal book for studying Java." -Anatoly Vorobey, Technion University, Haifa, Israel"Absolutely one of the best programming tutorials I've seen for any language." -Joakim Ziegler, FIX sysop"Thank you again for your awesome book. I was really floundering (being a non-C programmer), but your book has brought me up to speed as fast as I could read it. It's really cool to be able to understand the underlying principles and concepts from the start, rather than having to try to build that conceptual model through trial and error. Hopefully I will be able to attend your seminar in the not-too-distant future." -Randall R. Hawley, automation technician, Eli Lilly & Co."This is one of the best books I've read about a programming language.... The best book ever written on Java." -Ravindra Pai, Oracle Corporation, SUNOS product line"Bruce, your book is wonderful! Your explanations are clear and direct. Through your fantastic book I have gained a tremendous amount of Java knowledge. The exercises are also fantastic and do an excellent job reinforcing the ideas explained throughout the chapters. I look forward to reading more books written by you. Thank you for the tremendous service that you are providing by writing such great books. My code will be much better after reading Thinking in Java. I thank you and I'm sure any programmers who will have to maintain my code are also grateful to you." -Yvonne Watkins, Java artisan, Discover Technologies, Inc."Other books cover the what of Java (describing the syntax and the libraries) or the how of Java (practical programming examples). Thinking in Java is the only book I know that explains the why of Java: Why it was designed the way it was, why it works the way it does, why it sometimes doesn't work, why it's better than C++, why it's not. Although it also does a good job of teaching the what and how of the language, Thinking in Java is definitely the thinking person's choice in a Java book." -Robert S. StephensonAwards for Thinking in Java2003 Software Development Magazine Jolt Award for Best Book 2003 Java Developer's Journal Reader's Choice Award for Best Book 2001 JavaWorld Editor's Choice Award for Best Book 2000 JavaWorld Reader's Choice Award for Best Book 1999 Software Development Magazine Productivity Award 1998 Java Developer's Journal Editor's Choice Award for Best Book Thinking in Java has earned raves from programmers worldwide for its extraordinary clarity, careful organization, and small, direct programming examples. From the fundamentals of Java syntax to its most advanced features, Thinking in Java is designed to teach, one simple step at a time. The classic object-oriented introduction for beginners and experts alike, fully updated for Java SE5/6 with many new examples and chapters! Test framework shows program output. Design patterns are shown with multiple examples throughout: Adapter, Bridge, Chain of Responsibility, Command, Decorator, Facade, Factory Method, Flyweight, Iterator, Data Transfer Object, Null Object, Proxy, Singleton, State, Strategy, Template Method, and Visitor. Introduction to XML for data transfer; SWT, Flash for user interfaces. Completely rewritten concurrency chapter gives you a solid grasp of threading fundamentals. 500+ working Java programs in 700+ compiling files, rewritten for this edition and Java SE5/6. Companion web site includes all source code, annotated solution guide, weblog, and multimedia seminars. Thorough coverage of fundamentals; demonstrates advanced topics. Explains sound object-oriented principles. Hands-On Java Seminar CD available online, with full multimedia seminar by Bruce Eckel. Live seminars, consulting, and reviews available. See www.MindView.net Download seven free sample chapters from Thinking in Java, Fourth Edition. Visit http://mindview.net/Books/TIJ4 . Preface 1 Introduction 13 Prerequisites 14 Learning Java 14 Goals 15 Teaching from this book 16 JDK HTML documentation 17 Exercises 17 Foundations for Java 18 Source code 18 Errors 21 Introduction to Objects 23 The progress of abstraction 24 An object has an interface 26 An object provides services 29 The hidden implementation 30 Reusing the implementation 32 Inheritance 33 Interchangeable objects with polymorphism 38 The singly rooted hierarchy 43 Containers 44 Object creation & lifetime 46 Exception handling: dealing with errors 49 Concurrent programming 50 Java and the Internet 51 Summary 60 Everything Is an Object 61 You manipulate objects with references 61 You must create all the objects 63 You never need to destroy an object 67 Creating new data types: class 69 Methods, arguments, and return values 72 Building a Java program 74 Your first Java program 78 Comments and embedded documentation 81 Coding style 88 Summary 89 Exercises 89 Operators 93 Simpler print statements 93 Using Java operators 94 Precedence 95 Assignment 95 Mathematical operators 98 Auto increment and decrement 101 Relational operators 103 Logical operators 105 Literals 108 Bitwise operators 111 Shift operators 112 Ternary if-else operator 116 String operator + and += 118 Common pitfalls when using operators 119 Casting operators 120 Java has no "sizeof" 122 A compendium of operators 123 Summary 133 Controlling Execution 135 true and false 135 if-else 135 Iteration 137 Foreach syntax 140 return 143 break and continue 144 The infamous "goto" 146 switch 151 Summary 154 Initialization & Cleanup 155 Guaranteed initialization with the constructor 155 Method overloading 158 Default constructors 166 The this keyword 167 Cleanup: finalization and garbage collection 173 Member initialization 181 Constructor initialization 185 Array initialization 193 Enumerated types 204 Summary 207 Access Control 209 package: the library unit 210 Java access specifiers 221 Interface and implementation 228 Class access 229 Summary 233 Reusing Classes 237 Composition syntax 237 Inheritance syntax 241 Delegation 246 Combining composition and inheritance 249 Choosing composition vs. inheritance 256 protected 258 Upcasting 260 The final keyword 262 Initialization and class loading 272 Summary 274 Polymorphism 277 Upcasting revisited 278 The twist 281 Constructors and polymorphism 293 Covariant return types 303 Designing with inheritance 304 Summary 310 Interfaces 311 Abstract classes and methods 311 Interfaces 316 Complete decoupling 320 "Multiple in heritance" in Java 326 Extending an interface with inheritance 329 Adapting to an interface 331 Fields in interfaces 335 Nesting interfaces 336 Interfaces and factories 339 Summary 343 Inner Classes 345 Creating inner classes 345 The link to the outer class 347 Using .this and .new 350 Inner classes and upcasting 352 Inner classes in methods and scopes 354 Anonymous inner classes 356 Nested classes 364 Why inner classes? 369 Inheriting from inner classes 382 Can inner classes be overridden? 383 Local inner classes 385 Inner-class identifiers 387 Summary 388 Holding Your Objects 389 Generics and type-safe containers 390 Basic concepts 394 Adding groups of elements 396 Printing containers 398 List 401 Iterator 406 LinkedList 410 Stack 412 Set 415 Map 419 Queue 423 Collection vs. Iterator 427 Foreach and iterators 431 Summary 437 Error Handling with Exceptions 443 Concepts 444 Basic exceptions 445 Catching an exception 447 Creating your own exceptions 449 The exception specification 457 Catching any exception 458 Standard Java exceptions 468 Performing cleanup with finally 471 Exception restrictions 479 Constructors 483 Exception matching 489 Alternative approaches 490 Exception guidelines 500 Summary 501 Strings 503 Immutable Strings 503 Overloading &8216;+' vs. StringBuilder 504 Unintended recursion 509 Operations on Strings 511 Formatting output 514 Regular expressions 523 Scanning input 546 StringTokenizer 551 Summary 552 Type Information 553 The need for RTTI 553 The Class object 556 Checking before a cast 569 Registered factories 582 instanceof vs. Class equivalence 586 Reflection: runtime class information 588 Dynamic proxies 593 Null Objects 598 Interfaces and type information 607 Summary 613 Generics 617 Comparison with C++ 618 Simple generics 619 Generic interfaces 627 Generic methods 631 Anonymous inner classes 645 Building complex models 647 The mystery of erasure 650 Compensating for erasure 662 Bounds 673 Wildcards 677 Issues 694 Self-bounded types 701 Dynamic type safety 710 Exceptions 711 Mixins 713 Latent typing 721 Compensating for the lack of latent typing 726 Using function objects as strategies 737 Summary: Is casting really so bad? 743 Arrays 747 Why arrays are special 747 Arrays are first-class objects 749 Returning an array 753 Multidimensional arrays 754 Arrays and generics 759 Creating test data 762 Arrays utilities 775 Summary 786 Containers in Depth 791 Full container taxonomy 791 Filling containers 793 Collection functionality 809 Optional operations 813 List functionality 817 Sets and storage order 821 Queues 827 Understanding Maps 831 Hashing and hash codes 839 Choosing an implementation 858 Utilities 879 Holding references 889 Java 1.0/1.1 containers 893 Summary 900 I/O 901 The File class 901 Input and output 914 Adding attributes and useful interfaces 918 Readers & Writers 922 Off by itself: RandomAccessFile 926 Typical uses of I/O streams 927 File reading & writing utilities 936 Standard I/O 941 Process control 944 New I/O 946 Compression 973 Object serialization 980 XML 1003 Preferences 1006 Summary 1008 Enumerated Types 1011 Basic enum features 1011 Adding methods to an enum 1014 enums in switch statements 1016 The mystery of values() 1017 Implements, not inherits 1020 Random selection 1021 Using interfaces for organization 1022 Using EnumSet instead of flags 1028 Using EnumMap 1030 Constant-specific methods 1032 Multiple dispatching 1047 Summary 1057 Annotations 1059 Basic syntax 1060 Writing annotation processors 1064 Using apt to process annoIntended for Java programmers, this book explains the why of Java. From the fundamentals of Java syntax to its advanced features, it is designed to teach, one step at a time. Design patterns are shown with multiple examples throughout: Adapter, Bridge, Chain of Responsibility, Command, Decorator, Facade, Factory Method, Flyweight, and more.

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Stand: 25.02.2020
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